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. the major purpose for this foundation is trying to set up a program, a public education program, by using the health, lifestyle and more vegetables and fruit to reduce the cancer incidence and mortality. >> what are the major foot -- the major activities and functions of the foundation? you mentioned education. do you cut out courses or promotional videotapes for people to get a better understanding for ways to have a healthy diet and therefore a healthy lifestyle? >> the major thing for the education is teach the people that cancer is a preventable disease and that we focus on the family. so we educate the mother first. in the beginning, we are training 4000 mothers. and then we found the children play a major role in the family. we asked the mother to prepare more vegetables and fruit -- for the parents, especially the father -- and we asked for the mother, especially the father, and we started program in the elementary school. also, we are training the new dietitians in the school. and the training of the teacher and we set up all the teaching materials. so we have brochures and some a
to be part of it, and am aware of the fact that there is a crisis in higher education. textbooks cost too much. it is a fact that tuition is too high, and that is a problem, not a crisis. is a serious problem, although not a crisis yet, that students graduate from college with way too much student debts. a problem, not a crisis. parking is in adequate on practically even campus. students gain 15 pounds the first months they attend college. that is a problem, not a crisis. crisis in american higher education in my opinion is that there is 22 million students in n colleges and universities, and 21.5 million of them attend colleges and universities so far the left that they cannot see the middle- of-the-road or the telescope. is that they are not just liberals, but many of these schools -- and i am talking about famous, importance, wealthy colleges and universities -- are subverting the values not only of america, but of western civilization. i do not say that on these or maybe 98%e 99% of american students attend that every single student fox's attitude, nor every faculty or staff member. i
laws and less on the quality of education being provided? these are important questions that we believe the state audit will answer and i'm honored to be joined by [speaker not understood] in this effort to examine whether our community colleges and students are being treated fairly, consistently and without bias. we ask for your support to ensure our safe public community colleges are not being forced to waste [speaker not understood] through the fees and taxpayer dollars. [inaudible]. >> thank you. >> thank you. (applause) >>> hello, my name is marco low be and i'm a current ccsf student and i'm going to be a future college student there. ~ lopez if the community did not have the opportunity to attend city college and all of its programs, we would not have the means to change our choices in life. this freedom of choice to attend ccsf and the process of education is a tool to help many inspire and focus towards goals. excuse me. many of which seek focus from and is a means to inspire youth and adults of all cultural, religious, sexual backgrounds, and various incomes that a public need
of the friends of city college now is political pressure, first on the department of education to have you accjc rescind its actions against city college ~ and political pressure on sacramento and our state legislators to restore the master plan for higher education [speaker not understood]. thank you. (applause) >>> hello, everyone. my name is [speaker not understood]. i'm part of students making change. i'm also part of the student involvement [speaker not understood] undocumented student club on campus. and i just want to talk about the reality that a lot of people have been avoiding about city college of san francisco. as a student i've been part of this city college for two years. i just recently finished all my studies last semester. but, you know, like a lot of things are happening here, you know, there are a lot of problems in city college like we have bathrooms that haven't been fixed. we have -- [speaker not understood]. we also have a lot of resistance in terms like a couple years ago we had our resource center being requested by undocumented students and, you know, it was really sad
suspension of the rules to hear 138-13 sp2 to accept the voluntary closure by envision education, incorporated of its metropolitan arts and technology charter school, effective august 1st, 2013. roll call, please, ms. [speaker not understood]. yes, difficult need a motion. thank you. >> second. >> thank you. i heard motion and i just went right on. thank you for the second, vice president fewer. roll call please ms. castro. >> thank you. mr. logan? >> yes. >> ms. fewer? >> yes. >> mr. haney? >> yes. >> ms. maufas? >> yes. >> ms. mendoza? >> yes. >> dr. murase? >> aye. >> ms. wynns? >> aye. >> thank you. [speaker not understood]? >> yes. >> 7 ayes. >> now i'd hear a motion for 138-13 sp2 which is the resolution to accept the voluntary closure by envision of metropolitan arts and technology charter school effective august 1st, 2013. motion and a second. >> moved. >> second. >> thank you. may you please read the recommendation, mr. davis? >> yes, i will, thank you, president norton. superintendent's proposal 138-13 sp2 accept the voluntary closure by envision education, incorporated
. plus virtual education, why online schools are genuine moneymakers for entrepreneurs in china. and we will also look into why competition is increasing in that industry. before that, u.s. stock markets closed in the red today gave the dow was the worst performer, down 0.7%. hear the closing numbers. we will be back soon. stay tuned. >> china has decided to make domestic technology another engine for growth. what is this about? >> the government says it will boost public and household spending on the i.t. industry by more than 20% through 2015. the move is aimed to make the sector a new growth sector for the economy and involves the promotion of e-commerce business and the upgrade of the telecommunication infrastructure. the commerce sector, for example, is already booming in china and they target is by 2015 . in terms of infrastructure upgrades, the government will release four g mobile licenses later the sheer. -- 4g mobile licenses later this year. this is a very comprehensive guideline issued by the state council. it is a lot to take in. it will also be forced to limit government i
't want to lose city college. i know i want to have education for my kids [speaker not understood]. all the students so i will support city college. please keep open. thank you. (applause) >> i'm going to call a few more cards. alvin jah. renato [speaker not understood]. gordon mcclellan. patrick [speaker not understood]. [speaker not understood]. and kabin baras. okay. >>> hello, thank you very much for having this meeting. we really need it. my name is holman turner, i'm a professional photographer. i also teach at city college. i've done that for the past 17 years. so, ~ somehow i fell in love with students and they fell in love with me. and for months i've been walking around as if this was something surreal, that we could actually be thinking about shutting down city college. for months i kept asking myself if the accreditation firm that is seeking to close city college is so interested in the quality of their education, how could they possibly even consider putting 85,000 of them out on the street? the answer, of course, is contained in the question. only by putting them in the s
, the purpose of this hearing is really probably for me is to educate myself, other elected officials on how important city college is, to hear -- have a place where people can voice concerns about what's happening with city college as well as to hear what public officials are doing to protect city college. we have representatives from our state level of government and local level of government. i know that our assembly has taken steps and actions to support city college as well as the mayor's office has done so -- is doing so as well, as well involved with the trustee to make sure that city college is able to stay together and keep accreditation. just a couple weeks ago, while it wasn't a big splash, we did ask the question of the mayor at question time separate from our typical way, we ask questions of the mayor. it was more on the spot question to ask what the mayor is doing to support city college at our community -- who are reliant on city college. he poke at that. if we can get an update from the mayor's office as well what the mayor's office is doing. ~ spoke at that there have been q
manageable to pay back. we should say some of the education community have started to speak out and expressed concerns this could be a difficult process to implement. but the white house pushes back against that. they say they are going to get the input of colleges and universities as they begin this process. and, of course, ultimate approval would depend on congress. so that's a big question mark. the rnc calling this a lame duck bus tour. it's not clear that president obama would be able to get sort of the bipartisan support for this type of proposal that he's hoping for. and craig, to put this in a broader context, this is really the president's goal to tee up the fall budget battles. the budget and also, of course, the debt ceiling which he'll be dealing with this fall. that's part of the larger goal. we expect the president to come out in a few minutes. craig? >> kristen welker traveling with the president in buffalo. we'll hear from president obama in just a few moments. meanwhile, i want to bring in steve cornaki. let's talk about -- not just the president's plan here, but the rising c
is this doesn't feel like a game to me. (applause) >> this is about the lives and their educations and this is about san francisco and who we are. and the harm is real and immediate and doesn't wait till the end of the game. so, i want to thank you all again for stepping up. i think when we are dealing with a body that is unelected, unaccountable, nontransparent, it is very hard for elected officials to figure out how they -- what even their role is in trying to address this problem, that there is a real harm, it's real for san francisco. and i'm glad that you are doing everything that you can to try and address it, so, thank you. (applause) >> so, we can start public comment, and i have a number of cards to bring up. first, i want to put a card up forward that's alyssa messer with aft 21, 21 and might need a little extra time to present that. we need help getting that set up as well. and then what is the length of time for -- two minutes per person. okay. tell us when you're ready. >> so, sfgov-tv, can we have the -- thank you. >>> [speaker not understood] aft 21 21, we represent
years ago. >> and, gary, we've seen energy costs go up, education go up, even food prices are going up. that's another tax in some way. >> exactly. i think that's what tracy's getting to. it's not just the line items you put on your 1040, which are numerous these days, but you're right, it absolutely is. it's the cost of commuting, the gas tax, the food prices we pay. everything has gone up. the bottom line, the average household out there has less to spend. that's a fact. because they have less to spend, retailers like walmart, dollar general, et cetera, et cetera, are suffering, and they're going to continue suffering as long as that income stays low and the bigger point probably, that high unemployment rate stays as high as it is. >> in fact, walmart is warning basically that things are not going to get any better. what does that say when the world's largest retailer when they say, sales are going down? >> that could construe the upper end of the economy is doing better. that's not their target audience. i will say -- you guys are talking about half the equation. the you said gas pr
students, it should be there for everybody because education really does contribute to -- i think 60% of our culinary students end up within the first three months, they end up getting a job somewhere in san francisco hospitalities industry. these are like stories and these are statistics that we can continue to pump out. so, our institution actually does a very great job at educating students. i don't think that is at issue. in terms of governance, we just prioritize different things. when we lost $53 million, the first thing that we did was we looked at our administrators and we split the cost savings there. we looked at consulting fees and looked at cost savings there. that is drastically different than what some other colleges did. first they looked at their faculty to fire. then they looked at their staff to fire. then they looked at classes to cut. we said we don't want to balance the budget on the backs of students and our workers if we don't have to. and that's the drastically different approach to looking at it. once again, that reflects our values as leaders and elected lea
educated asian-americans. it's much more complicated than just skills. >> we've seen a lot of gaps. >> yes. >> if the gaps are not addressed, and future policies go forward, they just create a greater divide. >> yes, and so we have to be far more effective in what we do with unemployment, but we have to be committed to the public sector and understand this downturn we just had. we insured wall street. we said wall street can want fail. there's banks too big to fail. this downturn was the biggest decline in revenue for state and local government ever, and it was prolonged. the length and depth of it resulted in lower public employment and there's no clear path that it will come back. yet, we know we still need teachers, police on the beat, firefighters, and all the same public services. our demand for public services can't depend on the cycle. the federal government doesn't realize when you need the investment sector, you need have to a public sector. [applause] and so when we have these downturns, the federal government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the pro
education. she was able to study with [speaker not understood] and she also met architectural and design student all bert lanier whom she would marry, move to san francisco and raise six children. in 1968 as an sfusd parent ruth cofounded the alvarado workshop an innovative program that involved parents and professional artists in the public schools so that young children had the chance to develop more fully as individuals. at its peak, the alvarado arts workshop was in 50 public schools in san francisco. it employed artists musicians and gardners and recruited thousands of parents to be involved in public education and certainly was the precursor to our elementary arts program. out about the same time ruth became a member of the san francisco arts commission and began lobbying politicians and charitable foundations to support arts programs. she would go on to serve on the california arts council, the national endowment for the arts and become the first artist trustee of the fine arts museum of san francisco. later ruth was instrumental in founding the san francisco school of the arts, a
and criteria are supposed to substantiate the quality of education. and what accjc has done is distort the meaning of accreditation to make city college fulfill these criteria that don't really talk about the quality of education. let me move on real fast. secondly, punishment needs to fit the crime. okay. i work for muni. you have unreliable schedules. they haven't been fulfilling for 10 years, for over 10 years. shut it down, okay. [laughter] >>> you know the idea. okay. and just a few comments that i hope you guys can pass on. these were collected for accjc for the third -- could i just read one of them, the best one? >> just one. >>> okay, just one. this is from my next door neighbor. there are world class instructors teaching at city college, graduating high school students deserve their expertise. the problem ccsf faces in regard to the budget need to be addressed -- needs to be addressed in other ways, not by compromising its accreditation. and she was a student at city college and she's a high school teacher. and i got these comments to give to accjc and they just ignored it. s
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? clea understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is edu
education more affordable. in a speech that you can watch live here at c-span2, it's set for 11:05 this morning, he will unveil a number of measures including tuition costs, graduation rates and the average earning of graduates. for more on the president's bus tour, we spoke with a "usa today" reporter. >> host: mr. jackson, could you kind of highlight some to have message that the president will bring, especially a new take on how colleges should be ranked and how that ties to financial aid. >> guest: exactly, yes. this is the latest in a series of speeches he's been giving on the middle class, and this week's topic, as you mentioned, is college affordability. and he's going to outline a revamped plan for how to reduce those costs. first of all, it involves what he calls payment for performance. as you mentioned, he's going to the propose that colleges be ranked in terms of how they're holding down costs, holding down tuition and delivering more effective education for the better dollar. and these rankings will be tied to federal aid. the higher the school is ranked on the savi
talks about those experiences and her thoughts on issues pertaining to terrorism education and health care. >> host: melanie phillips in your just-released autobiography guardian angel you rights to the question i'm constantly asked whether i am now on the left or the right the answer is neither. i am simply À la fred -- daughter who believes in the repair of the world in a journalist who believes in speaking truth to power. why did you feel a need to write about that? that? >> guest: so many people tend to pigeonhole these days. you are either one or the other and this is just silly. life is much more complicated than that in most people are neither right nor left. they are ordinary folks getting along with living their life in the best way they can. to see the world as it is and what i have done for the last quarter of the century is as a journalist tell it as i see it to be, which means as a journalist i was trained to look at the facts, look at the evidence can't cut provide the diversion and tell people my conclusion. tell people the facts and tell people my conclusion. quite a
around promoting access to tap water in the context of our broader public outreach and education efforts. a you all know, the puc provides water, wastewater and municipal power here in san francisco. and as we think about our public education work, we really focus on sort of the theme of one water one system. we want people to understand where their water comes from. it's pristine [speaker not understood] from the sierra nevada that travels by gravity to san francisco. but then what happens after that water leaves their tap, leaves your body, and to really help people also understand about our wastewater system and the work that we do to make sure that that water is treated in a safe -- before it's discharged into the bay and ocean. so, one water one system is really a theme that guides our education efforts. so, some of the ways that we have been just helping to educate san franciscans about where their water comes from and why our water -- why we're lucky to have such a clean pristine water source. a couple of years ago, the puc received a water quality grant from the u.s. epa, it was
york and northeastern pennsylvania. he is talking about education. some of the news coming out of this event says that the president is going to propose a new system for rating colleges. there is a reaction coming in negatively from academia. the speech will happen at 11:00 -buffalo.ime at suny it will be on our companion network c-span 2. education will be the topic of today's town hall meeting peter and we will look at the status of primary education. that is at 7:30 p.m. eastern tonight. here is a brief look at our .rogramming >> 237 years after our finding -- after our founding, we have a fork in the road. we have educational freedom in the form of school choice. on the other side, we have the greatest push from washington in common core stations -- standards. milton friedman was the father of the school choice movement. the school choice movement was under the idea that educational opportunity, giving parents the ability to move their children out of the zip code confined areas would allow competition and allow greater opportunity. we have seen this and vouchers, tax credi
. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy ers. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to intr
of the botanical garden's education and community outreach activities. i want to highlight our youth education program as one of them. we serve 10,000 children a year. we reach almost every public elementary and k through eight school in san francisco. this is a really important program that we want to grow, not be forced to shrink for lack of funds. we fund the gardens management activities. we fund improvements. we are funding the nursery center for sustainable gardening and hiring and total support is more than $2 million a year and provide the garden 36,000 volunteer hours a year. fee revenue has grown to exceed expectations and we are growing as well. botanical garden is not different from other cultural institutions. the garden cannot survive on city funding alone much thank you very much. >> good afternoon supervisors. my name is mary pitts. i'm a dosant and trustee at the san francisco botanical garden. i'm here to support the lease management agreement and also the admissions program for non residents. i'm very impressed with the budget process which i have sat through for ho
of education. >> and -- >> and again, it's a peer. it is not a private organization. they're elected members. they are representing all the institutions in california. >> so, you know, i've heard that they get some funding from some foundations. do you know whether or not that's the case? >> i don't. >> do you think that would be relevant to know how objective they are? >> my job is to focus on meeting the accreditation standards so that we retain our education and this institution. i know everybody here in the room understands the vital importance that it has for the city and community. and accreditation is the public assurance that we meet a standard that all institutions are held to. and that is our goal. that's my goal and role. and, again, vice harris came and he spoke to the leadership of our institution. he spoke with -- it was a group meeting. it included academic senate leadership, classified senate leadership, afp 21 21, aeiu [speaker not understood], department chair, and he made it clear that what the college needs to do to keep its accreditation is to continue the work and conti
utilities commission, the puc, has worked along with the department of public health to educate residents to drink as much tap water as possible. i think [speaker not understood] and different efforts at the community level have been really beneficial, but we absolutely need to increase the ability of people to use their own refillable water bottles. and unlike bottled water, hetch hetchy tap water costs less than a half a penny per gallon. so, it's almost like costless in some ways. it's quality tested over 100,000 times a year and it's highly regulated by the environmental protection agency or the epa. i think the fear of drinking tap water often has been caused by slick and really misleading campaigns by the bottled water companies and over the years there is a certain fear. but i think the countering with a strong public education program, community education, has been critical. and many of you know that my work to work with christina and others within the department of public health to combat childhood obesity has been a passion of mine. but drinking tap water and lots of water has b
. >> a higher education is the single best investment you can make in your future. >> suarez: the president unveiled his proposal before a crowd of more than 7,000 at the university of buffalo, in upstate new york. >> at a time when a higher education has never been more important or more expensive, too many students are facing a choice that they should never have to make. either they say no to college and pay the price for not getting a degree-- and that's a price that lasts a lifetime-- or you do what it takes to go to college, but then you run the risk that you won't be able to pay it off because you got so much debt. >> suarez: according to the administration, tuition at four- year public universities has risen 250% over the past three decades, even as the average family income has risen just 16%. that's led to students taking on more debt: today the average student loan borrower graduates with more than $26,000 to pay off. the president said that must change. >> higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility in america. and if we don't do something about keeping it within
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginalized young people, to take part. >> you menti
to reform education waiver. and i'm very pleased to report that the waiver was granted by secretary of edward jones indication arney duncan, making us one of the first and only district-level waivers of the no child left behind, which means we no longer have to punish our students in high stakes testing and really impossible score improvements, and that we we're really at the cutting edge of school reform nationally. and i just want to recognize our superintendent, richard carranza, who has been working very closely with superintendent of multiple districts up and down the state. he has really proven to be a leader among these superintendents. i really appreciate you and the whole team of district staff who put together the waiver. >> yes, commissioner wynns. >> since we now have an update, having gotten a waiver, so, i wanted to ask what our next steps are. and i particularly wanted to ask at the time we had that meeting. and i think at the time we applied, too, i asked the question about what are we doing to hold back on contracts or what is our plan to redirect the money that we
was to help monitor potential contaminants in the water supply, but there was also a public education component to the grant. and, so, what we did is launched a education program that was really about what people should do if they were concerned about the water, concerned about water quality issues, is to call 311. but it also began to be a vehicle to talk about where, you know, our pristine hetch hetchy water. it was a really successful -- a successful education program. we saw the signs on muni bus station, you saw them on tv. and what actually happened as one outcome of that is anecdotally, people told us that they started to drink more water once they understood where it comes from. but also as people had water quality concerns, some of the concerns that christina alluded to in her presentation, people started calling 311 more. so, we had a 10% increase in water quality concerns and that again became another vehicle to talk to people about where their water came from to test to make sure the water was safe and assure them that, you know, in fact it was safe to drink. we also do to
. >> at the end of the week, will the president be proposing something new on college funding or education more broadly? >> it is three days away, but i welcome your interest. i think it is going to be hopefully, both fun and informative. i can tell you the president does plan to have -- the president does plan to have some new proposals he is going to be talking about. maybe later. not at this point. but in the next couple of days, we will have some more information. the president is going to be talking about his few that we need to rein in the skyrocketing cost of a college education that never has a college education been more critical to the economic success of middle- class families in this country. and if we are going to make sure that middle-class families continue to have access to economic opportunity, or students need access to a high- quality college education. we need to make sure that more middle-class families can get access to that college education, and that families trying to get to the middle class can also have the chance to afford a college education. >> the whole thing is c
right. item b, presentations to the board of education from the superintendent. mr. superintendent carranza. >> thank you, president norton, and you haven't lost that rolling of the rs, very good. so, good evening, everyone. i have some extended thoughts this evening to kickoff the school year. but needless to say, i and the rest of the staff are very excited for the start of the new school year. a few weeks ago we welcomed back our administrators and this week we welcome all of our teachers back to educating our students and collaborating with their colleagues in preparation for a great school year. we are not starting the school year with a lot of -- we're starting the school year with a lot of strong systems in place to support our students and teachers and we have multi-tiered system of support so that our schools know what it means to have support from a central perspective and our teachers who have the greatest need are getting the modethv services in those communities that have the greatest needs. as the year progresses, we will share more and more information and more detai
including your program we've identified a lot of the - to education not a bare. earlier this month movements planned and use a workshop around heath rirpz with to police. where we introduced the review to the community. this being our fifth summit based on the police and public relationships we've educated a lot of what the parents feel to be healthy relationships between youth and police. we work closely with the youth commission on a general order and have been doing this for 5 years to make sure that the youth and public voices is where our community members are effected. during our most recent summit we had four officers in attendance that work on housing and poverty who assisted in this workshop. and the pamphlets and other general information and the ruling role of the school community. at burn heights center we're striving for public accountant ability for the community. where the language binds the s r o sz to the contact is important. school officers should be a rows. it shouldn't be a threat to any student and m l o should frame the model relationship that us the community want to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,190 (some duplicates have been removed)